#11  
Old 01-27-2012, 10:06 AM
bullfighter199's Avatar
bullfighter199 bullfighter199 is offline
 
Location: Sylvan Lake, AB
Posts: 33
Cool pay structure

well to clarify the pay structures is tough, every company pays differently. Some pay day rate (anywhere from 350-200/day), others pay salary and job bonus (usually a percentage of ticket) or even flat rates. Depending on which company you choose, u may end up just as a medic or a firefighter, others you can end up as both. PM me if ya have any other questions
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  #12  
Old 02-28-2012, 11:18 AM
Firefiter_To_Be Firefiter_To_Be is offline
 
Posts: 15
Default Hi dear all Brothers and Sisters in industrial Fire Service,

After trying hard for city jobs and banging my head against the wall for almost 4 years in and out of lower mainland, I'm just wondering what are the odds of getting into industrial firefighting in Ft. Mac Murray? Which companies or departments are hiring and what is an industrial FF day and night like? I appreciate any inside scope on this and sorry if this has been asked before. I have tried to search and this was the latest threat which came up. I appreciate your time and thanks for sharing your thoughts and experiences.

Best regards,
FF_to_be
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  #13  
Old 02-29-2012, 09:28 AM
ABVOLFF ABVOLFF is offline
 
Posts: 14
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hmckay91 said is bang on, there is a BIG difference between a industrial fire brigade and a safety company. In the past I have worked some "fire" for safety companies and from my experience, what I found was the money was good but it came with a cost. Very long days a unhealthy life style and firefighting skills are not kept up. If all a person is looking for is cash hoping for the big blow out for bigger cash go for it. Just something to keep in mind safety companies are NOT fire departments and the focus is all about money and working for a safety company is not firefighting and does not compare in any way to an industrial brigade or municipal fire department.

So at the end of the day if a person is looking for a municipal or industrial job, get a regular job in town for less pay join a good volly fire department keep up your skills and take whatever training they offer and keep pushing out the resumes.

My 2 cents.
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  #14  
Old 03-01-2012, 09:21 PM
Firefiter_To_Be Firefiter_To_Be is offline
 
Posts: 15
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ABVOLFF View Post
hmckay91 said is bang on, there is a BIG difference between a industrial fire brigade and a safety company. In the past I have worked some "fire" for safety companies and from my experience, what I found was the money was good but it came with a cost. Very long days a unhealthy life style and firefighting skills are not kept up. If all a person is looking for is cash hoping for the big blow out for bigger cash go for it. Just something to keep in mind safety companies are NOT fire departments and the focus is all about money and working for a safety company is not firefighting and does not compare in any way to an industrial brigade or municipal fire department.

So at the end of the day if a person is looking for a municipal or industrial job, get a regular job in town for less pay join a good volly fire department keep up your skills and take whatever training they offer and keep pushing out the resumes.

My 2 cents.
Thanks for the info.
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  #15  
Old 03-10-2012, 01:39 PM
Fire343 Fire343 is offline
 
Posts: 3
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Expect to make between 60 - 70 k your first year in the oil patch. Most oil field companies pay a base salary $2000 - $3000 per month, plus bonus. The bonuses are usually a percentage of the ticket or (bill) charged to the oil companies for fire services. Bonuses can range anywhere from 3% and up to around 6% of the ticket. Bonus based on qualifications and years of service.
Don t get your hopes up of making 200k. You will work long hours and be on the road for up to 15 days with most companies.
There are some great oil field service companies out there to work for and most are hiring right now. In box me for more info.
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  #16  
Old 03-25-2012, 06:35 PM
OzzyOsmond OzzyOsmond is offline
 
Posts: 140
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The term "Indistrial Firefighter" can have a very broad definition.

There are the career guys (Your Suncor/Syncrude/CNRL/Shells), who are full timers, and have been given appropriate training throughout their careers to maintain their skills. Some of the northern departments get enough call valume to maintain their skills too.

Then there are the volunteers. These are plant operators by trade. Depending on the location, they're either "volun-told" that they're on the ERT, or they apply to be a part of the ERT as part of a selction process. While they receive SOME training, they're not really fully certified. Some get part of the 1081 series, but not all of it. Then they receive training from the full time guys, but usually the training hours are inadequate for the level of expectations (pumper operator etc.). This is an ugly paradigm that has no easy fix. Managers are trying to manage costs, and this training is usually the first thing they look at cutting.

Then there's the safety companies........they post for "firefighters", but I believe it's to catch the eyes of guys looking to get some experience. There's not really any firefighting, or training. It's just that some safety plan indicated that a stand-by crew was required to complete a job, and they send guys out to sit in a truck day & night. The guys may have their 1001s, and/or 1081s, but this is not firefighting in my opinion.

I know this'll piss off the guys that work for HSE, or Firemaster, but really, it's just a resume builder. Most of those guys are trying to get jobs with fire departments.
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  #17  
Old 03-30-2012, 09:21 AM
Fire343 Fire343 is offline
 
Posts: 3
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In response to Ozzy. Have you ever been to a blowout ! I work for a safety company in Alberta. Had a fire last week. We do not sit in our trucks for 12 hours. You are in bunker gear and ready at all times. There are many dangers involved in the patch. During a Frac they use Acids, Hydrocarbons, and Propane. They are hot fueling trucks an equipment throughout the shift. There can be anywhere from 10 to over 100 people on site.
Emergencys , including blowouts happen a few times a month.
If your sitting in your truck and not prepared you are not doing your job.
We put in long hours, are away from home up to 15 days at a time. But we make decent $.
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  #18  
Old 03-30-2012, 07:57 PM
littlejon littlejon is offline
 
Posts: 23
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Hmmmm, slop around in the mud capping well fires or walking around a plant checking extinguishers. What to do, what to do
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  #19  
Old 03-31-2012, 10:48 PM
Fire343 Fire343 is offline
 
Posts: 3
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The plant jobs are few and far between. Congrats to the guys that land them. They do pay better, and yes conditions are better. But the patch is a great place to start, and the good companies pay for continuing education, including your 1081. If you have your 1001s and a class 3 ( dz ) license there's jobs in AB.
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