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Old 03-20-2016, 12:35 PM
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FFbeaumont FFbeaumont is offline
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Default Structure Fire Decon

I've been asked to look into procedures to create SOG's for decontamination of entry personnel coming from the structure into rehab. I'm also trying to find an emergency decon and ppe doffing procedure for suppression personnel in case of an immediate need to decon prior to medical transport. I'm guessing I don't need to re-invent the wheel here. I wanted to throw this out into the firehall community to see what other Depts have.
Currently we have a wash down upon exit routine however we have nothing in regards to an actual SOG.
I see that a similar question was posted in a thread 5 years ago but maybe this would bump the topic again.
Thanks in advance for your input.
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Old 03-26-2016, 10:27 AM
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HookandLadder HookandLadder is offline
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I have seen some procedures that we have used in training that may look like this.

Exit the structure and allow your gear to off-gas for about 3 minutes, before disconnecting your regulator and going off air.

Wash down with a stand-alone shower device to remove any immediate contaminants before physically taking off your gear or making your way to the rehab area. I've seen both done in either order, upon exiting the structure.
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Old 03-26-2016, 05:41 PM
FF95 FF95 is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HookandLadder View Post
I have seen some procedures that we have used in training that may look like this.

Exit the structure and allow your gear to off-gas for about 3 minutes, before disconnecting your regulator and going off air.

Wash down with a stand-alone shower device to remove any immediate contaminants before physically taking off your gear or making your way to the rehab area. I've seen both done in either order, upon exiting the structure.
In addition to what's noted above, you can monitor for HCN provided you have the detectors. I know at least once I set the detector off after coming out for a new cylinder...

We simply have a 65mm reducer down to a garden hose and just cracking the valve to wash any large debris off (insulation, soot etc).
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Old 04-20-2016, 08:01 PM
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FFbeaumont FFbeaumont is offline
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Thanks guys for your input, this has turned into a bit of a project but I'm getting there. I am in agreement with the garden hose idea and when possible the waiting period for coming off air. The procedure for removal of super heated gear from a conscious/unconscious firefighter is pretty similar to removal of contaminated turnouts, minus the water application. Looks like that will be my next project after the decon SOG. If anyone is interested in seeing these when they're complete shoot me a PM
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Old 04-21-2016, 10:59 AM
FF95 FF95 is offline
 
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Originally Posted by FFbeaumont View Post
Thanks guys for your input, this has turned into a bit of a project but I'm getting there. I am in agreement with the garden hose idea and when possible the waiting period for coming off air. The procedure for removal of super heated gear from a conscious/unconscious firefighter is pretty similar to removal of contaminated turnouts, minus the water application. Looks like that will be my next project after the decon SOG. If anyone is interested in seeing these when they're complete shoot me a PM
I don't know what type of gear you use, however some manufacturers provide written instruction about how to remove super heater gear safely. I know Globe provides laminated instructions. May be worth looking into to help draft an SOP...
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Old 04-21-2016, 04:39 PM
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FLASHOVER05 FLASHOVER05 is offline
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First off.... Excellent topic!

I've come across a few different sog's on this so far, most department are running are quality monitoring for structure fires HCN and CO monitoring with a safety officer/ fire chief or designate.

Some departments run an electric fan with a misting spray and require a period of time in front of this decon area marked off while fully under breathing apparatus and full ppe. Removal and immediately bag and send for cleaning.

More departments are purchasing extractors and dryers or second sets of gear for general use. Lastly and most importantly, no one returns to the apparatus including scba until all equipment is cleaned ppe worn is removed until cleaned
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Old 04-22-2016, 04:04 PM
bigsmoke bigsmoke is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FLASHOVER05 View Post
First off.... Excellent topic!

I've come across a few different sog's on this so far, most department are running are quality monitoring for structure fires HCN and CO monitoring with a safety officer/ fire chief or designate.

Some departments run an electric fan with a misting spray and require a period of time in front of this decon area marked off while fully under breathing apparatus and full ppe. Removal and immediately bag and send for cleaning.

More departments are purchasing extractors and dryers or second sets of gear for general use. Lastly and most importantly, no one returns to the apparatus including scba until all equipment is cleaned ppe worn is removed until cleaned
Agreed - Great Topic!

One caution about the air quality monitoring is that while a monitor may have a zero reading, it is well studied that building materials, especially cement block can give off unhealthy vapours for days. Zero readings can cause doffing of ppe. Should never happen but sadly realty is ......

And would you lease pm me in regards to the department that does not allow contaminated pipe into the apparatus. Great SOG, would like to see how they implement it.
Thanks
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Old 04-23-2016, 10:14 PM
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FFbeaumont FFbeaumont is offline
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Glad to hear the positive feedback about the topic, I will look into the manufacturers (Starfield Lion) instructions as to proper removal of super heated gear. I'd imagine it would be similar across the board but maybe not. From what I've seen so far the sequence of removal isn't that different from the removal of contaminated gear. So far I think I'll be putting in a purchase request for some 2.5" to .75" reducers for some garden hose for the immediate light spray down of entry firefighters call it stage 1 decon. Just to knock down the bulk of airborne contaminants, especially asbestos. I'll be talking to our friends at BCAS to see what they require from us in regards to level of decon prior to assisting in rehab. I've sat an few ambulances off-gassing before but things have changed now.
Stage 2 would be full spray down and scrub if really dirty, while on Air in a clearly marked decon area away from rehab or command post. This would happen after two bottles or the member would not be entering the structure while the fire is not under control. Going back into an active fire environment with soaking gear wouldn't be good.
After going through the car wash you would move over to the gear doffing area where you would remove your gear in the following order with assistance from members in appropriate PPE.
Doffing sequence:
Helmet, SCBA(stay on air). open coat and remove by having it pulled inside out, gloves should come off with coat, don nitrile gloves provided by assisting FF, open pant clasps and slide pants down, step out of boots, remove balaclava(will have to be slide up low pressure hose), remove mask with air flowing. Don fresh hopefully dry coveralls and report to rehab or BCAS. Assisting FF will bag, ID and move SCBA to cleaning area.
All gear is getting sent away for cleaning now after every fire so that part is easy. Now what about the runoff water from all this? Is this an issue? Any thoughts on sequence etc?
Thanks guys
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Old 04-24-2016, 02:29 PM
NoJo NoJo is offline
 
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Hey,

If you're getting into asbestos, decon changes a bit in regards to WorkSafe compliance. We've gotten written procedures for asbestos, if you want to have a look at that. It might cover most of what you want to accomplish.

We're running a reducer to 3/4", and using a 25' 3/4" weeping line - same as we use for brush fires. It rolls up and packs nicely. We've got 4' brushes and heavy duty plastic bags marked as hazardous. All gear gets bagged and tagged, and put into the back of a utility pickup. All SCBA, flashlights, radios, hose, tools, etc., get put into the utility as well. All items are decontaminated at the station before returning to service.

All TOG (Starfield, as well) is required to be washed in our extractor before returning to service. If asbestos contaminated, the process is way longer and requires suits, respirators, hepa vacuums, negative pressure, and time, lots of time.

Fire me a text or email if you want more info.

Cam
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