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  #1  
Old 09-01-2006, 06:21 AM
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irsqyu irsqyu is offline
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Default A Look At Ornge's Mobile Ambulances And A Preview Of Their Medical Simulation Truck

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TORONTO, ON - This morning Ornge, a transport medicine company, held a little ceremony inside one of the hangars of Toronto Island Airport to announce that all of the air ambulances in Ontario would now be fully under their control and would bear their orange paint job as a result. Iíll let CTVís Monica Matys handle the political side of the event, for myself it was a chance to check out their advanced telemetry system, virtual hospital concept, and grab a peek at their upcoming mobile patient simulation transport rig.
Source: CTV.ca (click for full story)

This is fairly big news for Ontario, Ontario Air Ambulance is now ORNGE and will also be running Critical Care Land Ambulances
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  #2  
Old 09-03-2006, 08:33 AM
northernmedic northernmedic is offline
 
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Damn that colour is ugly. What's up with Ornge, that's just a little to cutting edge and trendy for me. Doesn't anyone just paint ambulance on anymore?
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  #3  
Old 09-03-2006, 10:07 AM
yyz_arff yyz_arff is offline
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Default ornge

A flight medic buddy sent me the translation for the acronym


ORNGE = Obscure Reference No-one Gets Entirely
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  #4  
Old 09-03-2006, 11:00 AM
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All the fancy names and colours don't mean squat when you still can't get them to come.
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  #5  
Old 09-03-2006, 01:28 PM
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irsqyu irsqyu is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ladymedic
All the fancy names and colours don't mean squat when you still can't get them to come.
Be nice now LM, I know someone that works there! SR
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  #6  
Old 09-03-2006, 02:08 PM
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Scuba Scuba is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by irsqyu
Be nice now LM, I know someone that works there! SR
I don't think nice has anything to do with it....honesty does though lol.
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  #7  
Old 09-03-2006, 03:07 PM
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Michael13 Michael13 is offline
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Originally Posted by Ladymedic
All the fancy names and colours don't mean squat when you still can't get them to come.
What do you mean they won't come? I had the chance back in June to attend an Air Ambulance information session at the London Airport. All departments in Elgin county were asked to send 1 or 2 members so they could report back to their departments. We saw a very informative Power Point slide show and were allowed to look in the choppers and talk to the medics and pilots. The bird was out when we arrived but got back just in time. We saw them land and taxi down the runway. The medic who gave us the tour said that for them to come, we need to call. Here's what I learned that night...I hope I remember it all.

It is up to the pilot whether or not the chopper takes off. They will not take off during the night(from a scene), and cannot land at an unmarked landing zone at night. The most common place would be a major hospital with a landing zone. They will not fly in freezing rain, but they can in snow. He said alot of ground ambulance medics and fire departments make a judgement themselves not to call Air Ambulance based on their own perspective of the scene. "Ahh it's too windy, they won't come". When they recieve a call, the pilot does internet research on where they are taking off from, where the scene landing site will be, and the predicted hospital they will then transport to. The fastest they can get off the ground is about 15 mins I believe, and they said they don't mind being cancelled in mid flight. Too many times they say they arn't called in time, then the ground crews get frustrated and transport my land ambulance anyway. They want a phone call as soon as you think they are required so they can take that 15 mins to pre plan their flight. Location does not matter to them. If they fly to the scene they prefer to land on a road way, but can do it from a field or similar flat area that is at least 100 feet by 100 feet. They can't stress enough about landing zones. No tarps, flares or firefighters waving their hands to mark the location. Tarps can get sucked into the intake and flares get knocked over and have caused grass/field fires. And firefighters running and chasing the bird is stupid, because pilots say they can see all those red trucks with flashing lights and know where the scene is. If they do a fly over they arn't blind or ignoring you, they are just approaching the scene from a different location. Half the time the pilot will reject the landing zone chosen by police, or fire because they just don't like it. The pilots reminded us that they can see everything from up in the air, and if they see a better spot they are going there. Never approach the chopper when the medics are unloading when they arrive on scene. They have lots of gear to carry and might look like they need help but they don't. Only time fire personal might help is with loading the PT. IF you are approaching the chopper, do it so the pilots can see you, but not from the front and rear. The tail rotor spins so fast you can't see it. You're headless if you get near it. The pilots can also dump the medics off if its getting dark, then they will fly to the nearest hospital landing site and wait for the land ambulance and the PT to arrive.

Biggest most important thing they stressed is to call. Land medics arn't the only personal allowed to call. Your officer or IC can make that judgement based on experience or previous similar situations. Remember the intial 15 min time frame where they need to get ready to go, so time is important for them. That gives 15 mins or more for land personal to cancel them, plus flight time. Out of London, they run average 3 calls a day. So sometimes they may be right over head, and at times, have beaten the land ambulance to scenes, but they can't do it unless they get the call.

Most important:

NO FLARES, TARPS, & Rookie FF's standing in the sugessted landing zone waving arms.
If its a MVA on a road, they will most likely land on the road, given it is clear of trees, hydro wires, etc. The birds weigh around 14,000 pounds, so that equals 14,000 pounds of air movement. If hose lines are pulled, they must be charged. Equipment that is light and can go airborn should be secure. The medic also laughed and said truck doors should be closed because once they pushed a door off the hinges, backwards, because the ff's left it open.

I think thats all! 3 or 4 basic rules to remember if the Air Ambulance comes on your scene, and always call in plenty of time if you want them to come. DO NOT HESITATE!
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  #8  
Old 09-03-2006, 03:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by irsqyu
Be nice now LM, I know someone that works there! SR
I heard he had gone back to air........he is fixed wing is he not? I don't see much of them anyways.

Michael, I work about an hour southeast of where you went to school, so you can imagine the number of opportunities to call in air. A response time of 50-60mins just to reach scene is not unheard of, and that is for the land ambulance, so we are quite adept at calling and requesting prior to us arriving scene. The Municipality has also ensured there are helipads throughout the area, some of them actually right beside the bases, allowing us to do a modified response by picking up the patient and transporting to the helipad where the patient is then loaded and taken to a trauma centre etc. Our biggest issue is either the fact that they are never available, won't fly due to weather (oh look there's a cloud in the sky ), or their response will be is excess of 90 mins (and we are 50/50 between Ottawa and Toronto so have a the opportunity for either). When available, they work wonderfully, they are just too few to be very effective.
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  #9  
Old 09-03-2006, 04:10 PM
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dentedhead dentedhead is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ladymedic
I heard he had gone back to air........he is fixed wing is he not? I don't see much of them anyways.

Michael, I work about an hour southeast of where you went to school, so you can imagine the number of opportunities to call in air. A response time of 50-60mins just to reach scene is not unheard of, and that is for the land ambulance, so we are quite adept at calling and requesting prior to us arriving scene. The Municipality has also ensured there are helipads throughout the area, some of them actually right beside the bases, allowing us to do a modified response by picking up the patient and transporting to the helipad where the patient is then loaded and taken to a trauma centre etc. Our biggest issue is either the fact that they are never available, won't fly due to weather (oh look there's a cloud in the sky ), or their response will be is excess of 90 mins (and we are 50/50 between Ottawa and Toronto so have a the opportunity for either). When available, they work wonderfully, they are just too few to be very effective.

I remember that too,nope sorry not going to fly today Ive had a big meal.

Michael of course when your getting the PR tour they will have you believe they fly hourly which sadly is not the case.I recently heard a new one from my wife. I found it hard to believe so I asked a friend who works in air dispatch.

They apparently will really drag their feet when it is someone from outside of Canada.Why you ask?Its too hard to get paid by the insurance companies.They cant or wont out right refuse but they take a super duper long time with flight plans etc.Hoping that the sending hospital just says F$%&it and sends the pt by land.

The air ambulance system can and has saved many lives, unfortunatley its not quite the silver bullet that they want you believe.

Dentedhead
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  #10  
Old 09-03-2006, 04:47 PM
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We haven't had a problem with them here. Most times we see them is 401 calls. But in my 5 year career I have seen them 5 or 6 times...thats alot for us. We have worked well with them each time.
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